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PRESS RELEASE


Developing Countries and China Tell Climate Conference: ‘It Is Just Like Apartheid’

Oct. 20, 2015 (EIRNS)—Nozipho Joyce Mxakato-Diseko, South Africa’s delegate to a meeting in Germany to prepare the final draft of the COP 21 genocide conference in Paris in December, told the conference:

"It is just like apartheid. We find ourselves in a position where in essence we are disenfranchised,"

saying that the views of the poor had been ignored, The Mail & Guardian of South Africa reports. Mxakato-Diseko spoke on behalf of the former G77 and China, now referred to as "the main grouping of more than 130 developing nations and China" (Reuters), of which South Africa is currently chairman.

Reuters adds that the

"last week of negotiations on the draft text, which began in Germany on Monday, got off to a stormy start with developing nations saying their demands had been omitted from the pared down 20-page draft."

The demands in question include provisions previously agreed on, on financial support for the cost of the program to poor nations, economies, and also holding the developed nations to account—provisions that could, in practice, scupper implementation of any agreement.

U.S. delegation leader Trigg Talley said the new text could work as a basis for talks, Reuters reported. "This document has many things that most parties cannot agree with," he said. Rich nations want to ensure that emerging economies will commit to act.

Said Reuters:

"The developing nations won a demand on Monday that they could re-insert national demands into the text, raising fears by some that it could again become unwieldy. The previous version ran to 80 pages."

In other words, the genocidalists don’t want any back-talk from the wogs.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon pushed the genocide line: "There is no time to waste," he told a news conference in Slovakia.

"It has been quite frustrating to see negotiators negotiating only based on their very narrow national perspectives. This is not a national issue, it’s a global issue."