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PRESS RELEASE


New LaRouche PAC Feature Video
Explodes the Lie of `Fixed Nature'

Oct. 5, 2010 (EIRNS)—A new video release, NAWAPA—The Lost Art of Bioengineering, by the Lyndon LaRouche LaRouche Political Action Committee, is a 22-minute production posted yesterday, which blows apart the backward view that nature is fixed, and does not change. The history of mankind's development of corn (maize) is used to dramatize the point, that it is the cognitive activity of mankind, which has reorganized and enhanced the biological, productive structure of Earth and beyond, and must continue to do so for the survival of man and biosphere. This video is the latest in a series of LPAC features, on its website section, "Infrastructure—NAWAPA and a New Concept for World Development."

The implications of the North American Water and Power Alliance initiatives are drawn out at the opening of the video. We stand at "the beginning of developing a coherent system for managing the planet as a whole..." Historically, and today, "man's cognitive activity—the noöosphere—recomposes the living structure of the Earth" to higher and higher levels of energy flux density and potential. This is bioengineering.

Therefore, the question that comes up—Are we not "disturbing" the natural state of Mother Nature with our interventions?—is nonsensical. Look at plant life, for example. The potential exists for plant life to exist at higher and higher states of being. "Plant life doesn't wish to remain untouched by the mind of humanity!"

The video shows this concept through the history of the corn plant, from its ancient wild ancestors in Mexico, teosinte (Zea mexicana and Zea diploperennis) to the present day varieties of high-yielding, high-energy varieties. Early wild corn specimens had few kernels; ancient cobs were smaller than a penny. Successive breeding improvements and cultivation practices over thousands of years by human intervention, uplifted this plant.

Integral with the botanical history of corn, whose prehistoric developments are in the Tehuacán Valley of Mexico, are the rise and fall of cultures in the greater region, which the video presents vividly, including the story of the bloody Aztecs and Teotihuacán.