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PRESS RELEASE


Surprise British Document Release Exposes Pre-Unification Plot Against Germany

Sept. 16, 2009 (EIRNS)—British Foreign Office Documents released Sept. 11 officially confirm that British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and French President François Mitterrand insisted that Germany give up national sovereignty, through the mechanism of European integration, as a precondition for the unification of the two Germanys in 1990, after the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989. The documents were released ten years before expected.

According to the Süddeutsche Zeitung of Sept. 5, which had received an advance copy of the documents that cover the period from April 1989 to November 1990, "Germany's acceptance of a common European currency was the price that Mitterrand exacted, and obtained, from [Chancellor Helmut] Kohl, for unification." Unfortunately, Germany thus missed the historic chance to use the fall of the Berlin Wall to launch great projects for the common development of both Eastern and Western European infrastructure and industries, as the LaRouche movement proposed at that time (cf. Productive Triangle Paris-Berlin-Vienna). Instead, under the suicidal criteria of the Maastricht Treaty, Germany proceeded to dismantle its productive economy, so as to calm the fears of the London-based interests, as did the other EU countries.

Although such diplomatic documents are usually kept secret for 30 years, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office decided to declassify some 500 pages after only 20 years. According to the Financial Times of Sept. 10: "The FCO's decision to publish the papers, after a year of deliberation by Whitehall officials, is being seen as an attempt by Britain to set the record straight and show that its diplomats were positive about reunification early on—in spite of Mrs. Thatcher's personal misgivings."

In fact, as Lyndon LaRouche pointed out, none of these revelations are new. But they could indicate moves within the British establishment toward a new international policy. Also indicative is the fact that, on the same day as the release of the official documents, the London Times revealed details of a secret conversation between Thatcher and Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachov, in September 1989, in Moscow, aimed at preventing the reunification of Germany. The Kremlin transcripts were obtained by a Russian "researcher" named Pavel Stroilov, who was given access to thousands of Gorbachov-era Soviet Politburo transcripts at the Gorbachov Foundation in Moscow, just before the documents were all recalled and classified. Stroilov brought copies of the documents to London, where he was to "continue his research."

EIR will be intensively following this story.