LaRouche receives 11.1% in
Colorado Democratic Primary


DENVER, CO., March 6--Lyndon H. LaRouche, Jr. received yet another highly significant vote in a two-way race with President Clinton in the Democratic primary election, which was held on March 5 in the state of Colorado. The final, unofficial results are as follows: With 100% of the vote from 2,857 precincts counted, Lyndon LaRouche received 11.1% of the vote with a total of 5,941 votes. President Clinton received 88.9% of the vote with a total of 47,584 votes.

In nine of the 63 counties in Colorado, Lyndon LaRouche received from 15 to as high as 30% of the Democratic vote.

LaRouche's vote total in the Colorado primary is the third significant vote received by the candidate thus far. On Feb. 24, LaRouche received 9.6% of the vote in the Delaware Democratic primary election in a two-way race with President Clinton. And on Feb. 27, LaRouche came in second with 34.5% of the vote in a three-way race in North Dakota, in which President Clinton was not on the ballot.

The two latter vote totals occurred after Lyndon LaRouche's January 27 nationwide, half-hour paid political broadcast on ABC-TV. The vote in Colorado occurred immediately following LaRouche's most recent, second nationwide half-hour paid political broadcast, on March 2 on NBC-TV.

Although the candidate has not yet won any delegates, he continues to be qualified for federal matching funds under FEC guidelines.

These vote totals, which have been ignored by the national media, bespeak a ``rumbling'' beneath the political surface, maintained thus far by the national media in respect to the Democratic primaries.

Although Lyndon LaRouche has stated that he does not consider himself a ``rival'' of President Clinton, his campaign is addressing basic issues, which no other candidate is effectively addressing.

Speaking at a Chamber of Commerce forum in Woodlands, Texas, on Feb. 28, before the March 5 Colorado primary, the candidate said: ``We won 9.6% in the Delaware Democratic primary. We took second place with 34.5% in the N. Dakota primary. We will have other surprises of that sort occurring in other primaries down the line. I'm seeking, naturally, as many delegates, and votes as possible, in order to shape the Democratic convention.

``This is a matter which is of concern to Republicans, as well as Democrats, since after the November elections, we're going to have to get together, at least the majority of us, and deal with what may be the worst economic crisis in our national history.''