LaRouche to Discuss Foundations of Foreign and Economic Policy
In April 18 CBS-TV Broadcast

The third of Democratic presidential candidate Lyndon LaRouche's national half-hour television broadcasts is set to air Thursday, April 18 on the CBS network at 9:30 p.m. Eastern Time (8:30 p.m. Central Time). The topic is foreign policy. Check local listings for local changes in schedule.


Leesburg, Va., April 11--The third of Democratic presidential candidate Lyndon LaRouche's national half-hour television broadcasts is set to air Thursday, April 18 on the CBS network at 9:30 p.m. Eastern Time (8:30 p.m. Central Time). Drawn entirely from a campaign speech LaRouche made in California, the broadcast centers on "U.S. foreign policy, presented as it should have been presented, but you never heard it this way before."

LaRouche stresses from the outset of his speech that the international financial system "is based on a hyperbolic bubble growth of financial obligations, which is sucking, like Dracula by night ... on real income, the real economy." He adds: "the international monetary and financial system is bankrupt ... nothing can be done or should be done to try to save it.... What you should do, is you should have the relevant governments put it into receivership and bankruptcy reorganization, to prevent social chaos; to ensure stability."

"The central issue facing the President of the United States, is to put the Federal Reserve System into bankruptcy reorganization."

In terms of trade agreements, LaRouche stresses that the U.S. must "scrap existing trade agreements and tariff agreements, and set up a new series of agreements which are based on protectionism for both the U.S. recovery, and allowing other nations to do the same thing.... Put up protective tariffs; not exorbitant tariffs, but protective tariffs which allow our farmers and our manufacturers to engage successfully in investing in businesses.... Other countries should have the same right. We should agree with them on tariff and trade agreements which serve that purpose to our mutual advantage, our mutual economic security."

LaRouche then takes his audience through a history of the conflict between America and the United Kingdom--and the oligarchical system of Empire it serves. The fundamental difference between the America of our Founding Fathers and the British Empire is "knowing the nature of man," LaRouche explains. Is man merely a "zoo animal," as the different empires throughout history have claimed? Or is he a "creature unique, in the respect that it's made in the image of God and given dominion over the universe?"

The basis for foreign policy must be "the institution of the sovreign nation-state," LaRouche asserts, because the purpose of the nation-state is to give each individual "the opportunity to realize the sacred potentiality" decreed in the Book of Genesis, to the benefit of present and future generations.