Executive Intelligence Review
This release appears in the December 22, 2000 issue of Executive Intelligence Review.

LaRouche to Congress:
Form Committee To Investigate Fraud

In response to a question asked by two Congressional offices during his Dec. 12 webcast, former Democratic Presidential pre-candidate Lyndon LaRouche called for the formation of a special Congressional Committee to investigate two issues which have been raised in the course of the electoral crisis: first, the question of the possible significance, of evidence of misconduct in the case of the Florida Presidential vote; and second, whether the kind of ballot confusion, generated by the many types of ballot designs and methods used in Florida, is an impairment of the elections. And should it not be required that some standard of ballot, and voting, be provided?

LaRouche expressed his confidence that President Clinton, like President Grant in the 1876 impasse, would be disposed to appoint such an independent commission.

While the questioners had indicated that they were under pressure not to pursue allegations of fraud, due to alleged considerations of international standing, and even the markets, LaRouche's first point of emphasis was that the Congress had an obligation to address the truth.

"First, our responsibility lies to the truth. The truth. The truth is, that we have evidence, in the case of Florida, as I referred to earlier, which should have been processed. You have the allegations, and the very strong indications of evidence supporting the allegations, that there was a general canvass of prospective voters, in the area in question, and that a number of people were wrongly disqualified by an essentially incompetent procedure, which denied them the right to vote, on the false allegation that they were convicted felons. That is, it was a made-up fact, or just an inference."

Don't worry about what effect these revelations will have on the election, per se, LaRouche emphasized. You don't ask that question when you are faced with evidence of a murder. You investigate.

Second, he raised the question of the responsibility of the Congress:

"Suppose the Congress wants to get really serious. Appoint a Special Committee of the Congress, probably with the encouragement of President Clinton--he probably would do it. From judging the man from a distance, I think he'd do it. The way Grant did this in Tilden-Hayes. A special commission of the Congress, to look at two questions. The question of the possible significance, of evidence of misconduct in the case of the Florida vote, the Presidential vote. And also, willful misconduct.

"Secondly, to look at this issue, which is a legitimate issue of Federal law, as to whether the kind of ballot confusion, generated by the many types of ballot designs, and methods used in Florida, whether that itself is an impairment of the elections. And should it not be required that some standard of ballot, and voting, be provided? A uniform standard, which the states can implement, but they must state that standard, so that in the national election, we know who's elected. And let the Congress investigate that.

"Let the Congress consider these two questions, as part of its duty, and certify who they consider to be the President-elect of the United States, as of January 20th of next year. And that, I think, is the only procedure which I think is Constitutional, and which would work."

The full text of LaRouche's webcast address is available on www.larouchepub.com and www.larouchespeaks.com. For more information, call 888-347-3258.

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